Saturday, August 25, 2012


Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. I’m Rebecca Scarberry (Scarberryfields on Twitter). I have interviewed another British author. As you all know, I am very fond of British authors. He is Francis Potts (FPotts on Twitter). Enjoy!
 
Scarberryfields: Can you tell us a little about your nationality?
Francis: I’m British. I come from a small rainy island in the North Atlantic.
Scarberryfields: When you finished your debut novel, did you miss the characters?
Francis: Not especially. The two main characters, Swann and Alison, get a satisfactory ending. I sometimes wonder what happened to some of the minor characters, like Mrs. Strange and Jackie, but perhaps they’ll turn up in another book.
Scarberryfields: While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn?
Francis: I’m fairly literate. Occasionally I need to look up a spelling (garrote, yesterday), and I use Google.
Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them?
Francis: My wife complains. My daughter is relatively supportive, and the cats don’t care just so long as I take breaks to feed them.
Scarberryfields: Does writing benefit you in any way and if so, how?
Francis: It gets my creative urges out of my system. I used to paint, but that’s much more awkward to organize, with models and studios and so on. With writing, I can write a single word, or I can sit down and crank out a couple of thousand.
Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks?
Francis: No. I have a look at Facebook or Twitter whenever I feel I’m in a lull, and I generally check my smartphone for messages whenever I pass by.
Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel?
Francis: No. I used friends. They’re much less likely to be gratuitously negative. I don’t go by what they say, but how quickly they read it. If they email me in the morning to say they sat up until 3 am because they couldn’t put it down, I know they like it. If they say they haven’t had time to finish it because of family commitments, I think it needs more work.
Scarberryfields: Do you feel social networking as a marketing tool, is beneficial?
Francis: Probably. It’s too early to say.
Scarberryfields: What is the last book called that you completed and published?
Francis: The last book published is Flying Lessons, my debut novel. The last book completed is Tilly Lake’s Road Trip, for which I’m currently trying to find an agent. Life After Pole Dancing is currently under construction.
Scarberryfields: Where can readers go to find your books?
   

Francis: Flying Lessons is on Amazon. www.amazon.com/dp/B005JOXPVS in the US and www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B005JOXPVS in the UK. If I can’t find a traditional publisher for Tilly Lake’s Road Trip, that’ll be on Amazon DP too. And Life After Pole Dancing. And so on.
I want to thank you, Francis for taking the time to answer my questions. Since you are new to Twitter, it has been a pleasure tweeting about your book and telling you what I know about Twitter. It goes without saying, I wish you the very best.

Saturday, August 18, 2012


Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. I am Rebecca Scarberry – Scarberryfields on Twitter.  I have interviewed author, Nicholas Forristal.  I think you will enjoy getting to know this talented author as much as I have.




Scarberryfields: Can you please tell us how many books you have written and their titles? Please also explain a little about each book. 

Nicholas: I have written one book and it was self-published on May 18, 2012. It's called “Chronicles of M”. It's a modern day story about a newly retired Hollywood agent who is offered a job working for an ex-government agency whose purpose is the handling of an unconventional man named "M" as he battles the supernatural. 

Scarberryfields: When you finished your debut novel, did you miss the characters? 

Nicholas: Nope! I started writing the second book the next day and I've got at least 2 more to do after that. 

Scarberryfields: While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn? 

Nicholas: The internet, family, sometimes I beat my head against the wall until I figure it out. At the end of writing, I'll hire a proper editor and let them tell me what I did wrong. Stephanie Dagg did the editing for this book (she's at http://www.ebook-ed.it/ ) and will probably do them from here on out. 

Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them? 

Nicholas: I do the majority of my writing in the early morning (5 am) or when I have time at work. So no, they only have to deal with me talking about it. 

Scarberryfields: Does writing benefit you in any way and if so, how? 

Nicholas: It makes the voices in my head stop talking. 

Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks? 

Nicholas: I can usually write in any setting. It's only when the writing becomes more difficult or thoughtful that I need to shut out the world. The chapter about this mortician named Uhler was mostly written in silence. It's one of my favorites. 

Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel? 

Nicholas: I used anyone willing to look at it. I figured the more opinions I got, the better off I'd be. 

Scarberryfields: What do you do when you aren’t writing? Do you have any hobbies or a job? 

Nicholas: Any time outside of writing or getting the word out is spent with my wife and son, video games, reading and watching television or movies. 

Scarberryfields: Are you writing anything at this time? If so, please tell us about it. 

Nicholas: I'm currently writing the sequel to Chronicles, it picks up moments after the first book ends. I've also been jotting ideas for some future books not related to the series. 

Scarberryfields: Where can readers go to find your books?

Nicholas: My book is on Amazon http://t.co/jwIdCja http://t.co/OLm6RR1 goodreads: http://t.co/ZNeCiZz My website is http://www.chroniclesofm.com/

Scarberryfields: Thank you, Nicholas for taking the time to answer my questions. I wish you the best with all your writing.

Monday, August 13, 2012


Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. I have another author interview. Her name is Nelda Copas (nrcopas on Twitter).  Hope you will enjoy getting to know her better, as I have. Enjoy!
 

Scarberryfields: Can you please tell us how many books you have written and their titles? Please also explain a little about each book.
Nelda: I have written two books. The first, Twisted Desires is the beginning of the Detective Delsey MacKay series. MacKay is pursuing a sadistic serial killer with the assistance of an FBI profiler, Walker Grey. The second book, Twisted Revenge is the sequel to Twisted Desires. Detective MacKay survived her encounter with a serial killer. It’s her first day back to work and the crime scene is extremely similar to those she had seen before. In this book MacKay is the object of the serial killer’s obsession.
Scarberryfields: When you finished your debut novel, did you miss the characters?
Nelda:  No because I carried them into the second book. I do miss the person MacKay was before her attack by the serial killer.
Scarberryfields: While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn?
Nelda:  I write the draft first then I usually hand it over to a friend that is an editor.
Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them?
Nelda:  I thought they might initially but they have been so supportive. The only one that doesn’t like the time I spend writing is my three year old grandson Gage.
Scarberryfields: Does writing benefit you in any way and if so, how?
Nelda:  It gives me an outlet for emotions. I see that if I’m upset or frustrated I can get those emotions out on the page.
Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks?
Nelda:  lol No that’s a bad habit of mine. I have Twitter and Facebook open all the time.
Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel?
Nelda:  With the first book I did. My husband and oldest daughter.
Scarberryfields: What do you do when you aren’t writing? Do you have any hobbies or a job?
Nelda:  I love to travel, do embroidery, read. I am a retired nurse from the U.S. Army.
Scarberryfields: Are you writing anything at this time? If so, please tell us about it.
Nelda: Actually I’m working on three books. The third installment in the Delsey MacKay series, a young adult zombie apocalypse, and a true crime.
Scarberryfields: Where can readers go to find your books?

Nelda:  Amazon.com, Barnesandnoble.com, and my website where they come autographed, neldacopas.com.

Scarberryfields: Thank you so much, Nelda for taking the time to answer my questions. I feel like we’ve met, since we tweet each other so much. Love your answers here and wish you the best with all your writing. Twisted Desires gets numerous RTs on Twitter when I mention it. Great title!!

Friday, August 10, 2012

Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. I am Rebecca Scarberry (Scarberryfields on Twitter). I have not only a muli-talented author here today, but I consider her a friend. I think you will love this interview of Monica La Porta. Enjoy!


Monica: Hi, Rebecca, thank you for having me on your blog.  After chatting so much on Twitter, it is so nice to visit your virtual house.

Scarberryfields: Can you tell us a little about your nationality/ancestry?

Monica: I’m an Italian who moved to Washington State in the summer of 2000. I love my new home. It’s one of those love stories that starts with more hate than love, but it slowly grows to respect, then affection, and finally admiration.  At the beginning, I felt lonely. I didn’t speak English and even daily errands were problematic. I was already in my thirties and I felt utterly frustrated because all of a sudden I had become dependent on other people to accomplish the simplest of tasks like talking to a doctor. Little by little, after countless hours of watching TV shows and movies, my understanding of the English language improved and I started timidly talking to anybody who was patient enough to listen. More than a decade has passed and I’m happy I moved to Washington State. I’ve grown into a person I would’ve never become otherwise and I like myself so much better for it.
Scarberryfields: When you finished your debut novel, did you miss the characters?
Monica: Yes, I did. When The Priest’s editing ended, I was left with a sense of loss. However, I knew I had other two stories where my characters had a chance to have their voices heard. When I finished writing the third and supposedly final chapter in the Ginecean Chronicles, I felt as if good friends had just said goodbye. Soon after, new ideas about a fourth book in the series came forth and I’m now working on it.


Scarberryfields: While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn?

Monica: During the writing phase, I have the online dictionary and the translator open and I consult them any time I have doubts about the correct use of a word. Once the story is completed, I send it to my two beta readers and I implement all the corrections I deem necessary. Finally, my editor, Amy Eye, starts working on the document chapter by chapter. We go back on forth correcting everything from content to punctuation, until we’re satisfied by the quality of the writing. In Pax in the Land of Women, we had chapters that went through a dozen editing passes. At the end, we couldn’t stand to read another word from those chapters.
Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them?
Monica: I’m one lucky author. My family supports me completely. Nobody has complained about the fact that most of the time I tend to live in another dimension. The house gets neglected on daily basis, but the cooking doesn’t because I love eating. As a side note, I tend to put on Facebook pictures of my culinary creations. Since I’m not a sharer, they are normally good indicators of my current mood. Peach cobbler means I need a friend’s hug. Paella on the other hand indicates everything’s just fine.
Scarberryfields: Does writing benefit you in any way and if so, how?

Monica: I’m one of those persons who go through life looking for their calling. I struggled for a long time trying to decide what I wanted to do when I grew up and all of a sudden I realized years had passed already. At first, I panicked. Soon after, I remembered how much I’ve always enjoyed creating characters and stories and I decided to give it a serious try. Writing calms me and gives me a sense of purpose. It’s my dream come true and the mere idea of being able to do what I like makes me feel good.
Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks?
Monica: I normally do. I turn on my tomato clock and work in slots of twenty-five minutes until I reach my daily quota of words. Sometimes, Twitter is too loud and lures me away and I can’t resist spending time with all the wonderful, interesting people out there.
Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel?

Monica: My husband is one of my two beta readers. He has an analytic mind and is attentive to details. He’s the one reader who notices if a door opens in the correct way or if a character limps on the right leg. He reads the whole story and makes notes. We discuss each and every point at length and more often than not I agree with his suggestions.
Scarberryfields: What do you do when you aren’t writing? Do you have any hobbies or a job?
Monica: Along the years I collected a few hobbies that enrich my daily life. I’ve always loved painting and now I’m using virtual canvases thanks to my Wacom tablet and my iPad. When my kids were young and the days were oftentimes too long, I discovered cold porcelain, a homemade dough that is easy to make and extremely versatile. I remember how fun was creating with my kids little figurines and sceneries to populate the tales I made up for their bedtime stories. Nowadays, I use cold porcelain dough to create flowers arrangements. Another hobby of mine is building dollhouses. I’m drawn to the miniature world as a moth to the flame. As I mentioned before, I love eating, therefore cooking is listed as a hobby as well. It gives me great pleasure to find exotic recipes and try them. Finally, any time I can I go for long walks with my beagle, Nero.
Scarberryfields: What is the last book called that you completed and published?


Pax in the Land of Women, the second book in The Ginecean Chronicles, was published last June.

Scarberryfields: Where can readers go to find your books?   

Monica: My books, The Priest and Pax in the Land of Women, respectively book one and two in The Ginecean Chronicles, are for sale on Amazon.



Monica: Rebecca, thanks again for being such a nice host. It has been an absolute pleasure answering your questions.
Scarberryfields: Thank you so much, Monica for taking time out from your busy life to answer my questions. We have been friends for a long time now and I am looking forward to you illustrating my novella, Messages From Henry. All of the young adults and adults, alike will be thrilled to see the beautiful watercolor paintings, you will hopefully make for me. This is if you find the time and I hope you will.  

Wednesday, August 8, 2012

Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. The following interview is with an author in my writing circle (promotional Twitter group) called, Author’s Social Media Support Group. His name is Joseph Ephraim. Enjoy!


Scarberryfields: Can you tell us a little about your nationality/ancestry?
Joe: You know that’s a really intriguing question: on my father’s line it’s mainly Jewish/Irish, however, on my mother’s side it’s really strange! You see she was adopted. All my family could find out about her was that her mother was a doctor’s daughter, and her father was a class above the gentry ~ obviously she was born out of wedlock, and in those days it was quite a stigma ~ the sad thing is I never got to question my mother about the aforementioned. She died two years ago!
Scarberryfields: When you finished your debut novel, did you miss the characters?
Joe: Nice one! I have hundreds of characters swimming around in my head ~ it’s all part of my make-up, (fiction), guess if one gets killed off in one of my books then a bit like the phoenix they inevitably rise from the ashes dust themselves off and adorn a new set of clothes, and, enter a new plot.
Scarberryfields: While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn?
Joe: You know what? every writer is different and they all have their own little traits.  A lot of writers today are worried about grammatical punctuation and grammar. I once did a 500,000 word dissertation examining the life and works of Christopher Marlowe and the relationship between the works of Marlowe and Shakespeare. The latter taught me virtually every aspect of writing covering all the classics post to modern day! Wow you may think, cool! Not really you see the Hoffman prize was instigated by an extremely clever ‘New York Times’ journalist, the late Calvin Hofman, who put up a ‘MILLION DOLLAR’ legacy for anyone who could definitely prove that Marlowe was the author of Shakespeare’s works. Well I took the bait hook line and sinker. Ten years later after a long hard slog, I came to the positive conclusion that Shakespeare’s canon was put together by a group of university wits. However, one only has to look at Marlowe’s Dr. Fautus, and compare The Jew of Malta to the Merchant of Venice to see pure genius at work!
Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them?
Joe: Yes definitely! However, as you all probably know writing is a very lonely business. I must say the greatest support I ever had was from the literary manager at ‘the Royal National theatre London.’ One Jack Bradley. He sent me quite a few notes, however, the most memorable was the one which read: “…for a piece of work to satisfy our large audiences it must contain a strong central and original idea. It needs to be imaginatively executed with flair and a hugely developed sense of craft and of course, not clash thematically with anything ever presented before. ~ I know these are challenging demands. No wonder so few writers regularly attain them. Moreover, fewer still do so without a lifetime’s experience.
Scarberryfields: Does writing benefit you in any way and if so, how?
Joe: No not really it takes up most of my time if ya get my drift ~ however, it’s fun and addictive!
Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks?
Joe: Yes I completely shut-off from everything ~ writing is like a jig-saw puzzle for me, I have my trusted note-book from which I take pieces, create and begin putting the jig-saw together, at the end of the day hopefully there’s a book!
Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel?
Joe: NO! :0)
Scarberryfields: What do you do when you aren’t writing? Do you have any hobbies or a job?
Joe: Travel and people listening and watching ~ I’ve been lucky, by nearly traveling the length of the Nile to visiting family over in Australia, and extensive travel around Europe, Italy, France, Spain, Greece, Turkey, from ‘The Valley of the Kings’ to standing in St. John’s cave, Patmos to standing under the dome in St. Peter Basilica…
Scarberryfields: What is the last book called that you completed and published?
Joe: See below:~
Scarberryfields: Where can readers go to find your books?
Joe: Just bang ‘Nourished By that Which Consumes’ by Joseph Ephraim into your U.S. Amazon search engine
Scarberryfields: Thank you, Joe for taking time out from your busy day to answer my questions. I’ve enjoyed getting to know more about you. It’s a pleasure having you in my circle. I wish you the best with your debut novel and any you publish in the future.

Monday, August 6, 2012


Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. My name is Rebecca Scarberry (Scarberryfields on Twitter). I have another great interview. This one is with author, James Conrad (RealJamesConrad on Twitter). I have thoroughly enjoyed getting to know him better and certain all of you will enjoy this also.



Scarberryfields: Can you please tell us how many books you have written and their titles? Please also explain a little about each book.

James Conrad: My first novel was The Ideal Man, which is kind of two stories in one. On one side of the coin, you have Grace Watts, a repressed free spirit in a joyless marriage to a real estate agent named David Watts in which she remains because she is scared of being alone. On the other side, you have Anthony Parris, an artist who is promiscuous because a heartbreak has left him cynical. Basically, their paths cross, and stuff happens.


My latest novel, Copperhead focuses on the adventures of John Gregor, a job seeker during the recession and the trouble he encounters as he finds work. After all the problems he faces, he experiences an awakening when he is invited into a class action lawsuit and begins to turn on his adversaries, becoming vindictive and litigious, using the system against the bosses. I wrote The Ideal Man to basically get back at an ex-girlfriend who said that writing “would be the death of me, but Copperhead is very personal to me – I LIVED most of what happened in that book.



Scarberryfields: When you finished your debut novel, did you miss the characters?

James Conrad: Not particularly. They will always exist on paper, and I might find myself with ideas for a sequel.

Scarberryfields:While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn?

James Conrad: Punctuation hasn’t quite been a problem for me. But when it comes to finding the right word for a particular passage, there’s always the thesaurus.

Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them?

James Conrad: Not so much. We all have our own lives but still make time for each other. That is what family is supposed to be about.

Scarberryfields: Does writing benefit you in any way and if so, how?

James Conrad: It’s a tremendous release and very comforting in and of itself. Considering the struggles I have faced throughout my life, if I didn’t reach for the notebook and pen, I would have reached for the gun. Also, as vindictive as it sounds, one of the most comforting things about writing is that it takes me to a place where I can torment and destroy all the people I am fed up with with total impunity and zero compunction.

Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks?

James Conrad: When I am entrenched in a project, I become totally reclusive. Sometimes I don’t leave my apartment for literally days unless it’s to get food or cigarettes.

Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel?

James Conrad: Sometimes.

Scarberryfields: What do you do when you aren’t writing? Do you have any hobbies or a job?

James Conrad: I enjoy watching movies, and I am an avid chess player and a competent guitarist. I also do freelance non-fiction writing to pay the bills.

Scarberryfields: Are you writing anything at this time? If so, please tell us about it.

James Conrad: I have outlined a speculative fiction novel and have immediate plans to start work on it. Definitely want to keep that on the down low for now, but the closer it gets to done, the sooner more people will hear about it.

Scarberryfields: Where can readers go to find your books?

James Conrad:Copperhead has been released through Smashwords and is available for download from that site. The Ideal Man can be purchased through Barnes & Noble and Amazon.

Scarberryfields: Thank you for answering my questions. I have enjoyed learning more about you. I look forward to learning more about your speculative novel and wish you the best, regarding your other works.

Thursday, August 2, 2012

Hello. Thank you for visiting my blog today. I am Rebecca Scarberry (Scarberryfields on Twitter). I have interviewed a very pretty and talented author: Sandra Nikolai. I'm certain you will enjoy getting to know her better, I did.




Scarberryfields: Can you tell us a little about your nationality?
Sandra: I’m Canadian. My ancestors emigrated here from Italy many generations ago. Nikolai is my married name.
Scarberryfields: When you finish your novels, do you miss the characters?
Sandra: I won’t have time to miss the main characters in my mystery novel, False Impressions. Megan Scott and Michael Elliott are coming along with me as I write the next book in the series, Fatal Whispers.
Scarberryfields: While writing, if you need help with punctuation, grammar, etc., where do you turn?
Sandra: I worked as a copyeditor for more than fifteen years, so I’m familiar with that aspect of the business. I have access to various dictionaries and style guides if I need to look something up, but nothing beats a second pair of eyes. After I complete a manuscript, I send it to a critique group for review and then to a professional editor as a final step before publication. I want to make sure my readers get the best product for their money.
Scarberryfields: With the number of hours spent writing, do family members support you or complain about the time spent away from them?
Sandra: It was tough at first, but I’ve learned to balance things out and now spend more time with my family and friends, especially on the weekend. They support my writing and enjoy my stories, and that means a lot to me.
Scarberryfields: When you’re writing, do you shut-off all social networks?
Sandra: Yes—it’s too tempting otherwise! I take short breaks from my writing for social networking three or four times a day. I work in a quiet room with no music, TV, or other diversions. I need to hear myself think.
Scarberryfields: Did you use any family members as Beta readers for your debut novel?
Sandra: Oh no, that would be asking for trouble! I use a critique group of writers who are familiar with the mystery genre. I critique their work as well, so it’s a fair exchange.
Scarberryfields: What do you do when you aren’t writing? Do you have any hobbies or a job?
Sandra: I retired early from the workplace but treat my writing as a full-time job. Considering the time I devote to my books, my blog, promotional activities, and so on, there never seem to be enough hours in the day left for much else. As far as hobbies go, I love to read, take long walks, listen to music, watch movies, and bake. Oh…and shop, of course!
Scarberryfields: What is the most rewarding part about being a writer for you?
Sandra: I spent many years learning the trade, so seeing my book published is a reward in itself. Recognition from readers makes it extra sweet, as does a nod from my writer peers. I’m happy just to have the chance to do something I love.
Scarberryfields: Please tell us all about the last thing you wrote.
Sandra: My new release is False Impressions, a tale of betrayal and revenge. Here’s a blurb:

Montreal ghostwriter Megan Scott falls under police suspicion when her husband and a female friend are found murdered. In what a Qu├ębec detective calls a crime of passion, startling evidence surfaces to implicate Michael Elliott, a young investigative reporter who’d rather rub elbows with scumbags than live the posh lifestyle he inherited.


Clutched out of her comfort zone, Megan is flung into Michael’s dark world of criminal investigation. As they make a last-ditch attempt to prove their innocence, an elusive enemy closes in and threatens their lives. Who wants them out of the way and why?


Their only path to freedom is to catch the twisted killer before they become the next victims. But not knowing who to trust or where to turn can have consequences that are just as lethal…


Scarberryfields: Where can everybody find your books?


Sandra: False Impressions is available at 




It will also be available in paperback soon. 


Scarberryfields: How can readers contact you? 

Sandra: On my website at http://sandranikolai.com/ or my blog at Sandra Nikolai, author blog 

Thank you for interviewing me, Becky. 
Scarberryfields: It was a pleasure getting to know you better. Thank you so much for taking time out from your busy schedule to answer my questions. I wish you the best with your writing.